So You’re an Underemployed High-Potential….

E. Forrest Christian Careers, Coaching Leave a Comment

I’ve been attending the Global Conference on Org Design here in Toronto, and some of the things that the speakers here have been saying will be relevant to all of y’all who are high-potentials who languish in underemployment with bosses who think much smaller than you do. You’re in your thirties and weren’t tapped as the Golden Boy or Girl back when you started your worklife, and have been bouncing from one career to another, doing various things for about one or two years before needing to move on.

You are so totally screwed.

I mean, you are totally, abosolutely SOL.

Yep, the news from the conference here is that as a high-potential [modes 6-9 will do for my actual argument, if you’ve been tracking me for awhile] if you don’t have a career path of high advancement by the time you are 30, you will never have one.

Ever.

Give it up because your boat ain’t coming in, even filled with potatoes. Your boat sunk offshore and you, my incredibly talented but highly unfocused friend, are screwed.

Except that this is so much bullshit coming from people who have little understanding of history, and it explains a bit why RO theory has almost but not quite no traction at all with anyone who actually does things.

I’d explain why but that’s for my personal blog. But they’re partly right: you’ve got to start living out your purpose in life rather than trying to get others to live it for you.

And, no, I’m not talking about buying some book by a guy out in California….

About the Author

Forrest Christian

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E. Forrest Christian is a consultant, coach, author, trainer and speaker at The Manasclerk Company who helps managers and experts find insight and solutions to what seem like insolvable problems. Cited for his "unique ability and insight" by his clients, Forrest has worked with people from almost every background, from artists to programmers to executives to global consultants. Forrest lives and works plain view of North Carolina's Mount Baker.  [contact]

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