On Implementation

E. Forrest Christian Change Leave a Comment

I’m getting more curious about issues of implementation. I admit that I’ve been more in the theoretical sphere, or simply more curious what it means for individuals within organizations.

It’s obvious that implementation has several issues coming along with it, the most important being the same as for any change effort: we still have to get widgets out the door and meet whatever our group’s numbers are even while we are changing how we run the place. It’s not unique to Requisiting an organization: we run into this every time we install a new IT system. The old system has to still work while you are putting into place the new one. Often that doesn’t work since the paradigms have changed. Of course, what normally precedes this is months and months of IT staff lying about how long and how difficult the transition will be. They might simply lack the experience to know, but since most of us who have been in the industry for more than a couple of years have been through at least one of these purgatorial experiences, I doubt it.

An RO installation would have similar problems. Two unique systems would have to be in place, running side by side. Unfortunately, as people learn about a “Real Boss” theory, they become dissatisfied with any boss who does not fit that description. They chafe under the load or tire of the stretch.

And, of course, active resistance from persons who should be helped by the change doesn’t move us forward, either. Most people who are promoted above their competence fear the change over to a more meritocratic system. People who have built a system based on having a large fiefdom won’t like it, either.

So why start with people who don’t want to participate?

About the Author

Forrest Christian

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E. Forrest Christian is a consultant, coach, author, trainer and speaker at The Manasclerk Company who helps managers and experts find insight and solutions to what seem like insolvable problems. Cited for his "unique ability and insight" by his clients, Forrest has worked with people from almost every background, from artists to programmers to executives to global consultants. Forrest lives and works plain view of North Carolina's Mount Baker.  [contact]

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